color your world
a day in the life of joe roessler
color your world
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generalelectric:

This week, our 3D printers are working overtime to build one badass machine. This is a piece of our latest creation. Can you guess what we’re making? 
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"

To say that “socialism doesn’t work” is to overlook the fact that it did. In Eastern Europe, Russia, China, Mongolia, North Korea, and Cuba, revolutionary communism created a life for the mass of people that was far better than the wretched existence they had endured under feudal lords, military bosses, foreign colonizers, and Western capitalists. The end result was a dramatic improvement in living conditions for hundreds of millions of people on a scale never before or since witnessed in history.

But what of the democratic rights that these peoples were denied? In fact, with the exception of Czechoslovakia, these countries had known little political democracy in the days before communism. Russia was a czarist autocracy, Poland a rightist dictatorship with concentration camps of its own, Albania an Italian fascist protectorate as early as 1927, Cuba a U.S sponsored dictatorship. Lithuania, Hungary, Rumania, and Bulgaria were outright fascist regimes allied with Nazi Germany in World War II.

"

Michael Parenti, Blackshirts and Reds (via partyapparatchik)

man only someone who never actually lived in those places would say that

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likeafieldmouse:

Edward Curtis - The North American Indian
“In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. The work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. 
Morgan’s funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis himself would receive no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. 
Curtis’s goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before it disappeared. 
He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: 
The information that is to be gathered…respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost. 
Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. 
He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. 
He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. 
He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only written recorded history although there is still a rich oral tradition that documents history.”
…
1. Klamath Indian at Crater Lake
2. Two Whistles, Apsaroke
3. Dancing to Restore an Eclipsed Moon
4. Tobadzischini
5. Haschogan 
6. Haschezhini
7. Bear Bull - Blackfoot
8. Red Cloud
9. Apache Gaun
10. Offering to the Sun - San Ildefonso
…
What a picture of Indian character this affords: a mere infant starting out alone into the fastnesses of the mountain wilds, to commune with the spirits of the infinite, a tiny child sitting through the night on a lonely mountain-top, reaching out its infant’s hands to God! On distant and near-by hills howl the coyote and the wolf. In the valleys and on the mountain side prowl and stalk all manner of animals. Yet alone by the little fire sits the child listening to the mysterious voices of the night.
—Edward Curtis
likeafieldmouse:

Edward Curtis - The North American Indian
“In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. The work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. 
Morgan’s funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis himself would receive no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. 
Curtis’s goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before it disappeared. 
He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: 
The information that is to be gathered…respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost. 
Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. 
He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. 
He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. 
He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only written recorded history although there is still a rich oral tradition that documents history.”
…
1. Klamath Indian at Crater Lake
2. Two Whistles, Apsaroke
3. Dancing to Restore an Eclipsed Moon
4. Tobadzischini
5. Haschogan 
6. Haschezhini
7. Bear Bull - Blackfoot
8. Red Cloud
9. Apache Gaun
10. Offering to the Sun - San Ildefonso
…
What a picture of Indian character this affords: a mere infant starting out alone into the fastnesses of the mountain wilds, to commune with the spirits of the infinite, a tiny child sitting through the night on a lonely mountain-top, reaching out its infant’s hands to God! On distant and near-by hills howl the coyote and the wolf. In the valleys and on the mountain side prowl and stalk all manner of animals. Yet alone by the little fire sits the child listening to the mysterious voices of the night.
—Edward Curtis
likeafieldmouse:

Edward Curtis - The North American Indian
“In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. The work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. 
Morgan’s funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis himself would receive no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. 
Curtis’s goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before it disappeared. 
He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: 
The information that is to be gathered…respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost. 
Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. 
He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. 
He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. 
He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only written recorded history although there is still a rich oral tradition that documents history.”
…
1. Klamath Indian at Crater Lake
2. Two Whistles, Apsaroke
3. Dancing to Restore an Eclipsed Moon
4. Tobadzischini
5. Haschogan 
6. Haschezhini
7. Bear Bull - Blackfoot
8. Red Cloud
9. Apache Gaun
10. Offering to the Sun - San Ildefonso
…
What a picture of Indian character this affords: a mere infant starting out alone into the fastnesses of the mountain wilds, to commune with the spirits of the infinite, a tiny child sitting through the night on a lonely mountain-top, reaching out its infant’s hands to God! On distant and near-by hills howl the coyote and the wolf. In the valleys and on the mountain side prowl and stalk all manner of animals. Yet alone by the little fire sits the child listening to the mysterious voices of the night.
—Edward Curtis
likeafieldmouse:

Edward Curtis - The North American Indian
“In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. The work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. 
Morgan’s funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis himself would receive no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. 
Curtis’s goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before it disappeared. 
He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: 
The information that is to be gathered…respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost. 
Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. 
He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. 
He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. 
He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only written recorded history although there is still a rich oral tradition that documents history.”
…
1. Klamath Indian at Crater Lake
2. Two Whistles, Apsaroke
3. Dancing to Restore an Eclipsed Moon
4. Tobadzischini
5. Haschogan 
6. Haschezhini
7. Bear Bull - Blackfoot
8. Red Cloud
9. Apache Gaun
10. Offering to the Sun - San Ildefonso
…
What a picture of Indian character this affords: a mere infant starting out alone into the fastnesses of the mountain wilds, to commune with the spirits of the infinite, a tiny child sitting through the night on a lonely mountain-top, reaching out its infant’s hands to God! On distant and near-by hills howl the coyote and the wolf. In the valleys and on the mountain side prowl and stalk all manner of animals. Yet alone by the little fire sits the child listening to the mysterious voices of the night.
—Edward Curtis
likeafieldmouse:

Edward Curtis - The North American Indian
“In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. The work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. 
Morgan’s funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis himself would receive no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. 
Curtis’s goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before it disappeared. 
He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: 
The information that is to be gathered…respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost. 
Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. 
He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. 
He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. 
He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only written recorded history although there is still a rich oral tradition that documents history.”
…
1. Klamath Indian at Crater Lake
2. Two Whistles, Apsaroke
3. Dancing to Restore an Eclipsed Moon
4. Tobadzischini
5. Haschogan 
6. Haschezhini
7. Bear Bull - Blackfoot
8. Red Cloud
9. Apache Gaun
10. Offering to the Sun - San Ildefonso
…
What a picture of Indian character this affords: a mere infant starting out alone into the fastnesses of the mountain wilds, to commune with the spirits of the infinite, a tiny child sitting through the night on a lonely mountain-top, reaching out its infant’s hands to God! On distant and near-by hills howl the coyote and the wolf. In the valleys and on the mountain side prowl and stalk all manner of animals. Yet alone by the little fire sits the child listening to the mysterious voices of the night.
—Edward Curtis
likeafieldmouse:

Edward Curtis - The North American Indian
“In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. The work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. 
Morgan’s funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis himself would receive no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. 
Curtis’s goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before it disappeared. 
He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: 
The information that is to be gathered…respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost. 
Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. 
He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. 
He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. 
He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only written recorded history although there is still a rich oral tradition that documents history.”
…
1. Klamath Indian at Crater Lake
2. Two Whistles, Apsaroke
3. Dancing to Restore an Eclipsed Moon
4. Tobadzischini
5. Haschogan 
6. Haschezhini
7. Bear Bull - Blackfoot
8. Red Cloud
9. Apache Gaun
10. Offering to the Sun - San Ildefonso
…
What a picture of Indian character this affords: a mere infant starting out alone into the fastnesses of the mountain wilds, to commune with the spirits of the infinite, a tiny child sitting through the night on a lonely mountain-top, reaching out its infant’s hands to God! On distant and near-by hills howl the coyote and the wolf. In the valleys and on the mountain side prowl and stalk all manner of animals. Yet alone by the little fire sits the child listening to the mysterious voices of the night.
—Edward Curtis
likeafieldmouse:

Edward Curtis - The North American Indian
“In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. The work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. 
Morgan’s funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis himself would receive no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. 
Curtis’s goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before it disappeared. 
He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: 
The information that is to be gathered…respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost. 
Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. 
He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. 
He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. 
He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only written recorded history although there is still a rich oral tradition that documents history.”
…
1. Klamath Indian at Crater Lake
2. Two Whistles, Apsaroke
3. Dancing to Restore an Eclipsed Moon
4. Tobadzischini
5. Haschogan 
6. Haschezhini
7. Bear Bull - Blackfoot
8. Red Cloud
9. Apache Gaun
10. Offering to the Sun - San Ildefonso
…
What a picture of Indian character this affords: a mere infant starting out alone into the fastnesses of the mountain wilds, to commune with the spirits of the infinite, a tiny child sitting through the night on a lonely mountain-top, reaching out its infant’s hands to God! On distant and near-by hills howl the coyote and the wolf. In the valleys and on the mountain side prowl and stalk all manner of animals. Yet alone by the little fire sits the child listening to the mysterious voices of the night.
—Edward Curtis
likeafieldmouse:

Edward Curtis - The North American Indian
“In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. The work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. 
Morgan’s funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis himself would receive no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. 
Curtis’s goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before it disappeared. 
He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: 
The information that is to be gathered…respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost. 
Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. 
He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. 
He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. 
He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only written recorded history although there is still a rich oral tradition that documents history.”
…
1. Klamath Indian at Crater Lake
2. Two Whistles, Apsaroke
3. Dancing to Restore an Eclipsed Moon
4. Tobadzischini
5. Haschogan 
6. Haschezhini
7. Bear Bull - Blackfoot
8. Red Cloud
9. Apache Gaun
10. Offering to the Sun - San Ildefonso
…
What a picture of Indian character this affords: a mere infant starting out alone into the fastnesses of the mountain wilds, to commune with the spirits of the infinite, a tiny child sitting through the night on a lonely mountain-top, reaching out its infant’s hands to God! On distant and near-by hills howl the coyote and the wolf. In the valleys and on the mountain side prowl and stalk all manner of animals. Yet alone by the little fire sits the child listening to the mysterious voices of the night.
—Edward Curtis
likeafieldmouse:

Edward Curtis - The North American Indian
“In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. The work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. 
Morgan’s funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis himself would receive no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. 
Curtis’s goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before it disappeared. 
He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: 
The information that is to be gathered…respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost. 
Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. 
He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. 
He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. 
He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only written recorded history although there is still a rich oral tradition that documents history.”
…
1. Klamath Indian at Crater Lake
2. Two Whistles, Apsaroke
3. Dancing to Restore an Eclipsed Moon
4. Tobadzischini
5. Haschogan 
6. Haschezhini
7. Bear Bull - Blackfoot
8. Red Cloud
9. Apache Gaun
10. Offering to the Sun - San Ildefonso
…
What a picture of Indian character this affords: a mere infant starting out alone into the fastnesses of the mountain wilds, to commune with the spirits of the infinite, a tiny child sitting through the night on a lonely mountain-top, reaching out its infant’s hands to God! On distant and near-by hills howl the coyote and the wolf. In the valleys and on the mountain side prowl and stalk all manner of animals. Yet alone by the little fire sits the child listening to the mysterious voices of the night.
—Edward Curtis
likeafieldmouse:

Edward Curtis - The North American Indian
“In 1906, J. P. Morgan provided Curtis with $75,000 to produce a series on the North American Indian. The work was to be in 20 volumes with 1,500 photographs. 
Morgan’s funds were to be disbursed over five years and were earmarked to support only fieldwork for the books, not for writing, editing, or production of the volumes. Curtis himself would receive no salary for the project, which was to last more than 20 years. 
Curtis’s goal was not just to photograph, but to document, as much American Indian (Native American) traditional life as possible before it disappeared. 
He wrote in the introduction to his first volume in 1907: 
The information that is to be gathered…respecting the mode of life of one of the great races of mankind, must be collected at once or the opportunity will be lost. 
Curtis made over 10,000 wax cylinder recordings of Indian language and music. 
He took over 40,000 photographic images from over 80 tribes. 
He recorded tribal lore and history, and he described traditional foods, housing, garments, recreation, ceremonies, and funeral customs. 
He wrote biographical sketches of tribal leaders, and his material, in most cases, is the only written recorded history although there is still a rich oral tradition that documents history.”
…
1. Klamath Indian at Crater Lake
2. Two Whistles, Apsaroke
3. Dancing to Restore an Eclipsed Moon
4. Tobadzischini
5. Haschogan 
6. Haschezhini
7. Bear Bull - Blackfoot
8. Red Cloud
9. Apache Gaun
10. Offering to the Sun - San Ildefonso
…
What a picture of Indian character this affords: a mere infant starting out alone into the fastnesses of the mountain wilds, to commune with the spirits of the infinite, a tiny child sitting through the night on a lonely mountain-top, reaching out its infant’s hands to God! On distant and near-by hills howl the coyote and the wolf. In the valleys and on the mountain side prowl and stalk all manner of animals. Yet alone by the little fire sits the child listening to the mysterious voices of the night.
—Edward Curtis
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roachpatrol:

algopop:

NetFlix Summary Bug
A user of a netflix app has been documenting a bug that seems to fail to refresh the top half of the screen, accidentally mashing up film descriptions. The glitches have been widely covered by the press already but I’ve included them here as they remind me of some of the tactics employed by bot makers such as twoHeadlines by Darius Kazemi, or AndNowImagine by Ivy Baumgarten.

I WOULD WATCH ALL OF THESE
roachpatrol:

algopop:

NetFlix Summary Bug
A user of a netflix app has been documenting a bug that seems to fail to refresh the top half of the screen, accidentally mashing up film descriptions. The glitches have been widely covered by the press already but I’ve included them here as they remind me of some of the tactics employed by bot makers such as twoHeadlines by Darius Kazemi, or AndNowImagine by Ivy Baumgarten.

I WOULD WATCH ALL OF THESE
roachpatrol:

algopop:

NetFlix Summary Bug
A user of a netflix app has been documenting a bug that seems to fail to refresh the top half of the screen, accidentally mashing up film descriptions. The glitches have been widely covered by the press already but I’ve included them here as they remind me of some of the tactics employed by bot makers such as twoHeadlines by Darius Kazemi, or AndNowImagine by Ivy Baumgarten.

I WOULD WATCH ALL OF THESE
roachpatrol:

algopop:

NetFlix Summary Bug
A user of a netflix app has been documenting a bug that seems to fail to refresh the top half of the screen, accidentally mashing up film descriptions. The glitches have been widely covered by the press already but I’ve included them here as they remind me of some of the tactics employed by bot makers such as twoHeadlines by Darius Kazemi, or AndNowImagine by Ivy Baumgarten.

I WOULD WATCH ALL OF THESE
roachpatrol:

algopop:

NetFlix Summary Bug
A user of a netflix app has been documenting a bug that seems to fail to refresh the top half of the screen, accidentally mashing up film descriptions. The glitches have been widely covered by the press already but I’ve included them here as they remind me of some of the tactics employed by bot makers such as twoHeadlines by Darius Kazemi, or AndNowImagine by Ivy Baumgarten.

I WOULD WATCH ALL OF THESE
roachpatrol:

algopop:

NetFlix Summary Bug
A user of a netflix app has been documenting a bug that seems to fail to refresh the top half of the screen, accidentally mashing up film descriptions. The glitches have been widely covered by the press already but I’ve included them here as they remind me of some of the tactics employed by bot makers such as twoHeadlines by Darius Kazemi, or AndNowImagine by Ivy Baumgarten.

I WOULD WATCH ALL OF THESE
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thecreativesense:

MAD Architects envisage a hybridised city-scale concept that blends old China with contemporary architecture. 
The Nanjing Zendai Himalayas Centre was conceived with the Chinese concept of ‘shansui’ - the achieved spiritual harmony between nature and humanity. The complex features living spaces that consider the environmental relationship between the site and its surroundings, while also providing for all the material needs of today’s society. Construction is underway and completion is planned for 2017.
See more on the project at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

MAD Architects envisage a hybridised city-scale concept that blends old China with contemporary architecture. 
The Nanjing Zendai Himalayas Centre was conceived with the Chinese concept of ‘shansui’ - the achieved spiritual harmony between nature and humanity. The complex features living spaces that consider the environmental relationship between the site and its surroundings, while also providing for all the material needs of today’s society. Construction is underway and completion is planned for 2017.
See more on the project at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

MAD Architects envisage a hybridised city-scale concept that blends old China with contemporary architecture. 
The Nanjing Zendai Himalayas Centre was conceived with the Chinese concept of ‘shansui’ - the achieved spiritual harmony between nature and humanity. The complex features living spaces that consider the environmental relationship between the site and its surroundings, while also providing for all the material needs of today’s society. Construction is underway and completion is planned for 2017.
See more on the project at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

MAD Architects envisage a hybridised city-scale concept that blends old China with contemporary architecture. 
The Nanjing Zendai Himalayas Centre was conceived with the Chinese concept of ‘shansui’ - the achieved spiritual harmony between nature and humanity. The complex features living spaces that consider the environmental relationship between the site and its surroundings, while also providing for all the material needs of today’s society. Construction is underway and completion is planned for 2017.
See more on the project at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

MAD Architects envisage a hybridised city-scale concept that blends old China with contemporary architecture. 
The Nanjing Zendai Himalayas Centre was conceived with the Chinese concept of ‘shansui’ - the achieved spiritual harmony between nature and humanity. The complex features living spaces that consider the environmental relationship between the site and its surroundings, while also providing for all the material needs of today’s society. Construction is underway and completion is planned for 2017.
See more on the project at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

MAD Architects envisage a hybridised city-scale concept that blends old China with contemporary architecture. 
The Nanjing Zendai Himalayas Centre was conceived with the Chinese concept of ‘shansui’ - the achieved spiritual harmony between nature and humanity. The complex features living spaces that consider the environmental relationship between the site and its surroundings, while also providing for all the material needs of today’s society. Construction is underway and completion is planned for 2017.
See more on the project at: DesignBoom
thecreativesense:

MAD Architects envisage a hybridised city-scale concept that blends old China with contemporary architecture. 
The Nanjing Zendai Himalayas Centre was conceived with the Chinese concept of ‘shansui’ - the achieved spiritual harmony between nature and humanity. The complex features living spaces that consider the environmental relationship between the site and its surroundings, while also providing for all the material needs of today’s society. Construction is underway and completion is planned for 2017.
See more on the project at: DesignBoom